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20130113
20130121
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the way the move freight that fuels our economy. map 21 streamlines and consolidates programs and map 21 helps to shorten project delivery a priority for president obama and congress. when we deliver projects faster, when we deliver their benefits faster. like enhancing safety, less congestion and a cleaner environment. the project delivery improvement included in map 21 based on an innovative -- innovation initiative known as everyday counts. they took it from you, victor. you've done a great job with every day that counts. let's hear it for decter menendez and what he has done and what his team has done. thank you, victor. [applause] the concept behind everyday counts is the same as this year's thp. better, faster and smarter. finally map 21 helps us keep our transportation system safe. this law gives the department for the first time oversight over transit safety. again, a big thanks goes to peter rogoff. in the train crash your and 10, peter and i decided that we would commit ourselves to getting the department of transportation into the transit safety business and thanks to all of h
the economy collapse. and in classic washington fashion, this is the case with the schoolhouse is on fire and rather than focusing on putting the fire out, everyone in washington runs out to use as much water. the budget deficit is the economy right now. that's the to 50 minute like that but that's the truth. i think it would be great if an organization with strength and integrity of a or b. would stand up and make the point because we're having an entire budget that is basically premised on something that is not true. >> i agree with you. we do have underlying pieces of our economy that need to get fixed. but massive change in spending and we've already cut a trillion dollars over all in spending. we've cut medicare as part of the political their act. we have to be really careful and just solving these problems by cutting spending. .. >> we do it in a way that supports families and the population that we have. >> let me just add to that. i agree with you, but unfortunately, most of the people on social security will be on fixed budgets. and so there's still a danger having out-of-pocket
job creation and the american economy. today we will hear from s.e.c. commissioner danny gallagher who i think is well-positioned to lay out an agenda for this in the next year. we hope this is an agenda that can attract strong bipartisan support. mr. gallagher brings a unique combination of backgrounds. he started as general counsel for a financial services firm. then joined the staff of commissioner paul atkins and worked for commissioner, worked for the -- at the f.c.c. as deputy director and then acting director in one of the largest divisions. he's been on the senior professional staff, then was in private practice and about 14 months ago was confirmed by the u.s. senate as securities and exchange commission commissioner. i think everybody who who knows him will know several things about him. he is smart, he understands the complex issues. second, he is -- he has an ability to see another person's perspective and find consensus and make forward progress on issues and understands that you can achieve consensus while still remaining true to principle and finally that he is a great p
and undermine their idealism. if we permit our economy to drift and decline, the vulnerable will suffer most. we must live up to the calling we share. civility is not a tactic or a sentiment. it is the determined choice of trust over cynicism, of community over chaos. and this commitment, if we keep it, is a way to shared accomplishment. america, at its best, is also courageous. our national courage has been clear in times of depression and war, when defending common dangers defined our common good. now we must choose if the example of our fathers and mothers will inspire us or condemn us. we must show courage in a time of blessing by confronting problems instead of passing them on to future generations. together, we will reclaim america's schools, before ignorance and apathy claim more young lives. we will reform social security and medicare, sparing our children from struggles we have the power to prevent. and we will reduce taxes, to recover the momentum of our economy and reward the effort and enterprise of working americans. we will build our defenses beyond challenge, lest weakness invite
have the will to the poverty a priority with in this country? >> you have to have the real economy. but we have now? i am amazed -- you could talk about public education, we could talk about health care. everyone knows that a single payer health care system would -- insurance would cover everyone. insurance companies would be gone. cost, quality, access would be at a premium in terms of our ability to be a civil society if we had a single payer health care system. we could generate almost 3 million jobs, which would serve to stimulate the rest of the economy when you are building -- and actually taking care of the people. they know that in washington. viable. -- valuable. they just want to privatize it. i think you all doing a beautiful job -- the nurses appreciate you so deeply. honestly, the progressive caucus, the black caucus -- but one of the things that you said, and i completely agree, is that you have got to push. we have got to treat a movement in this country -- occupy was a moment. it needs to start up and keep going -- it needs to bring millions of people with it. the r
, when you consider the impact of drought in the economy, in some nations in africa it has been up to 9% of the gdp of the nation's. for instance, in zimbabwe or even in kenya. so when you consider all this, i think more need to be done for preparedness and for early action. unfortunately the question is why is it the information on early, early warning, i think it's because first, drought is not a kind of charismatic disaster. it's not like tsunami or earthquake. it has little subterranean impact. second, we're experiencing more frequent drought. we are reluctant to take action on early warning because maybe they're concerned about taking action and being found wrong. so uncertainty is something that scientists alike. i think my third point also might be that one might say why should we act so early? we may undermine the capacity of committee. so when you put all these together, you may have some reasons why early warning is not leading to early action. >> thanks for the question. this issue crosses pretty much everything we are going to hear. why you said that information about the fu
promises. or helping the economy. how did you weigh those? when he makes a promise on the plus side, does he get a plus on at 500 or does he get a negative? the net -- the next time, does he get guest: we have a category called obama's top promises. you can look at those and you can see that i think his record of fulfilling them is not quite as high as overall. you make a good point -- some of his promises were sweeping and thematic and others were very specific. there were two that were lighthearted -- we included two promises like that. one was his promise during the campaign that he would buy his daughter as a puppy which is a promise kept in the other was that he would fight for a college football playoff system which we also raided a promise kept indeed, you could say this is the aggregate and you need to look in on the more narrow numbers. we published an article yesterday but we welcome anybody who wants to tally them up in different ways and provide an analysis. all promises are not created equal. host: we are looking at the top promises on politifact - tell us more about compromi
and mathematics backgrounds to stay in the u.s., use those skills to grow our economy, help our country, rather than go back to their home country. host: the white house sees hope for bipartisan deal on immigration based on what senator marco rubio of florida, republican, has put out there. he's put some ideas out there. do you -- do you endorse liz ideas? guest: i have not spoken to senator rubio yet, but we welcome those ideas. there are others in the house that are working on specific proposals and wider ranging proposals, and we want to take a look at this. you know, we are a nation of immigrants. there is not a person to be found who's a u.s. citizen who can't go back a few generations or several generations and find someone in their family who came to the united states to better their lives. my grandfather came from germany. my wife's parents came from ireland. this is a very, very common thing. we are also a nation of laws. so finding a way to address this issue and fix a very broken immigration system will entail looking at a lot of different pieces of this, including enforcement and wh
in washington. for washington, this is a great injection into the economy. host: this is from one of our viewers -- guest: thought the inauguration funding has not changed very much. the best comparison for this year is 2005, the george w. bush second inauguration, $45 million was raised for his committee. security costs there were comparable. there rose fivefold after 9/11. by 2005 they were in the $100 million range. this inauguration, despite hardships, the numbers are staying fairly concept -- fairly constant. host: our first president was sworn in on april 30 in new york city. it has moved back and forth from the east front to other locations on capitol hill. from harry truman through jimmy carter, it was always on the east front of the capital. moved by the congressional committee to the west front in 1985, which is where it remains today. kansas, independent line, good morning. caller: i think it is amazing that we all want to complain about every penny that is spent in washington, d.c., because of the inauguration. this is something special that happens every four years. surely, surely,
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9